Autodromo Josť Carlos Pace
Avenida Senidar Teotonio,
Viela 261,
Sao Paulo,
Brazil
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Brazil's number one circuit at the moment is the Interlagos track at Sao Paulo.

Brazil is the home of some of F1 history's top drivers - first to mind is Ayrton Senna, a man who was adored by his country. His Brazilian contempory is Rubens Barrichello.

In 1996, the race was nearly cancelled due to an incredible torrent of water from the skies of Brazil. More of a powerboat race than an F1 event it suddenly turned Hill into a star.

It's said by many that the wet is where the cars are made equal. Others (like me, Ed) believe that the differences between cars become worse with the rain. Either way, Hill 'Drove like God', to paraphrase Niki Lauda's response. He simply powered away from the start and left the rest of the F1 grid trailling in his wake.

 

Race Day : March 30th 1997

Circuit Length: 5.369 kilometres/3.274 miles

GMT -3 hours

Friday Practice: 11.00-12.00 and 13.00-14.00
Saturday Practice: 09.00-09.45 and 10.15-11.00
Saturday Qualifying: 13.00-14.00

Sunday Warm-Up: 08.30-9.00

BRAZILIAN GRAND PRIX: 13.00 ... 71 Laps, 307 kilometres, 191 miles

Lap Record Michael Schumacher (1994) 1m18.455s/198.42 kph

Winners:

   
1996 Damon Hill Williams
1995 Michael Schumacher Benetton
1994 Michael Schumacher Benetton
1993 Ayrton Senna McLaren
1992 Nigel Mansell Williams
1991 Ayrton Senna McLaren
1990 Alain Prost Ferrari
     
     

Brazil's Interlagos was the centre of F1 racing in the country for the 1970's. In the 80's, though, racing switched to Rio's circuit.

The old circuit, a majestic 4.3 miles long, was a challenge for drivers and cars alike. However, without major work it wasn't going to be able to usher in the new era of TV based F1 racing. So for a decade the race was run at Rio's Jacarapegua track as Interlagos updated the track with a safer, more modern layout that still poses a challenge to modern machinery. Media and spectator facilities were also dramatically improved, and the race returned in 1990.

It might only be 2.7 miles long now, but of the South American events that remain, it's one of the better examples - certainly a superior racing circuit to Argentina's relatively lacklustre effort.

The Australian Circuit

1997 Championship Contents

Formula 1 Contents